Yerba Maté

$ 16.95

Quantity:

Raw Mate - delicious. Shade grown, fairly traded, highest grade and totally fresh. Low heat dried, no smoky flavor, more nutrient dense. Amazing, simply the best maté we have ever come across. Origin - Brazil.




2.0 oz Pouch $6.95 - 30 servings 23¢ per cup | 4.8 oz Tin $16.95 - 72 servings 24¢ per cup

Water: 208°F | Leaves: w tsp per 12 ounce cup | Infusion Time: 3 - 4 minutes

Basic Steeping Tips
- Use filtered or spring water, whenever possible
- Don’t over-boil water 
- Remove leaves after recommended time (adjust to taste) 
- If you want stronger tea, use more leaves instead of steeping for a longer time

There are 196 active chemical compounds found in the Yerba Maté plant. Of those, 144 are also found in green tea. Yerba Maté contains 11 polyphenols. Polyphenols are a group of phytochemicals. Phytochemicals (phyto- meaning plant) are recently-discovered compounds that act as powerful antioxidants and are considered to exhibit anti-cancer effects in mammals by strengthening an organism's natural defenses and protecting it against cellular destruction
In addition to polyphenols, Yerba Maté leaves contain saponins. Saponins are phytochemicals that have been found to specifically stimulate the immune system and aid the body in protecting against disease.

Each infusion of Mate contains:
Vitamins: A, C, E, B1, B2, Niacin (B3), B5, B Complex
Minerals: Calcium, Manganese, Iron, Selenium, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus
Additional Compounds: Fatty Acids, Chlorophyll, Flavonols, Polyphenols, Trace Minerals, Antioxidants, Pantothenic Acid and 15 Amino Acids.
Most native yerba mate is, by default, organic. We have all our native yerba mate areas certified though, and conduct extraction in a manner that doesn’t damage the other vegetation in the forest.

The Argentina experience is not complete without daily servings of yerba mate. It is common for friends to convene to "matear" several times a week. In cold weather the beverage is served hot and in warm weather the hot water is often substituted for lemonade. Children often take yerba mate with lemonade as well.

The gourd is passed around, often in a circle, and each person finishes the gourd before giving it back to the brewer. 

The gourd (also called "mate") is passed in a clockwise order. Since mate can be re-brewed many times, the gourd is passed until the water runs out. When a person no longer wants to take mate, they say "gracias" to the brewer when returning the gourd to signify they don't want any more.