Tropical Green

$ 18.95

Quantity:

Tropical green tea unlike any other.

Well-balanced, nuanced, with a flavorful green tea base and true flavor extracts.

Hand blended in small artisan batches, this tea is meant to please all the senses. Visually stunning with rose petals, marigolds and safflowers, this aromatic tea is also beautiful to watch steep. The perfectly steamed sencha green tea is also blended with bunches of pineapple and papaya pieces for a colorful and incredibly delightful tea. This is fantastic chilled tea, as well. We made this to be an unabashedly indulgent tea, so dive in. Can be resteeped with great results.




2.0 oz Pouch $10.95 - 30 servings 37¢ per cup | 3.4 oz Tin $18.95 - 51 servings 37¢ per cup

Water: 175-185°F | Leaves: 2 heaping teaspoons per 12 ounce cup | Infusion Time: 3 minutes

Basic Steeping Tips 
- Use filtered or spring water, whenever possible 
- Don’t over-boil water
- Remove leaves after recommended time. Can be resteeped.
- If you want stronger tea, use more leaves instead of steeping for a longer time.

 

Medical research strongly suggests that antioxidants in the form of catechins in green tea play a role in increasing the production of good cholesterol, reducing the negative effects of bad cholesterol, and lowering triglyceride levels. They have also been shown to inhibit excessive blood clotting which may help against stroke and heart disease.

The history of tea in China is long and complex. The Chinese have enjoyed tea for millennia. Scholars hailed the brew as a cure for a variety of ailments; the nobility considered the consumption of good tea as a mark of their status, and the common people simply enjoyed its flavor.

Tea was first discovered by the Chinese Emperor Shennong in 2737 BC. It is said that the emperor liked his drinking water boiled before he drank it so it would be clean, so that is what his servants did. One day, on a trip to a distant region, he and his army stopped to rest. A servant began boiling water for him to drink, and a dead leaf from the wild tea bush fell into the water. It turned a brownish color, but it was unnoticed and presented to the emperor anyway. 

The emperor drank it and found it very refreshing, and cha (tea) was born.